Business Tax Recovery Logo


Tax Deduction Consulting: Child Support Douglas GA

The truth is that the IRS is being consistent in this ruling and is not being unfair to the non-custodial parent, at least not deliberately. The principle that guides the idea of deductions of this sort is the idea that what generates a tax break for one entity generates income for another.

Monica Ann Krachman
3355 LENOX RD NE BLDG
ATLANTA, GA
Specialties
Family, Child Custody, Divorce, Child Support
Education
Vanderbilt University Law School,University of Pennsylvania
State Licensing
Georgia

Carol B. Powell
6445 POWERS FERRY RD NW STE 265
ATLANTA, GA
Specialties
Family, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support, Adoption
Education
Emory University,Miami University of Ohio,Georgia State University
State Licensing
Georgia

Christopher T. Anderson
(706) 548-8668
244 E WASHINGTON ST
ATHENS, GA
Specialties
Business, Aviation, Child Support, Divorce, Child Custody, Family
Education
University of Georgia School of Law,Cornell University
State Licensing
Georgia, New York

Damon Sharad Bivek
(404) 460-7080
3003 Summit Boulevard, Suite 1500
Atlanta, GA
Specialties
Family, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support, Adoption
Education
Georgia State University,Emory University
State Licensing
Georgia

M. Kim Michael
304 E WASHINGTON ST
ATHENS, GA
Specialties
Family, Child Support, Child Custody, Wills, Estate Planning
Education
University of Georgia, Athens,University of Georgia, Athens
State Licensing
Georgia

Robert William Gurd
(478) 953-4557
311 Margie Dr
Warner Robins, GA
Specialties
Criminal Defense, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce, Litigation
Education
McGeorge SOL Univ of the Pacific,Hanover Coll
State Licensing
California, Georgia

Carolyn Karettis
750 HAMMOND DR NE
ATLANTA, GA
Specialties
Family, Alimony, Child Support
Education
Nova Southeastern University,University of Florida
State Licensing
Georgia

James Paul Blalock
216 N ERWIN ST
CARTERSVILLE, GA
 
Regina Irene Edwards
(404) 841-0155
3445 PEACHTREE RD NE STE 350
ATLANTA, GA
Specialties
Domestic Violence, Child Custody, Child Support, Alimony, Family
Education
Tulane University Law School,North Carolina Central University
State Licensing
Georgia

Suzanne Michelle Hovastak
(404) 460-5667
3003 Summit Boulevard, Suite 1500
Atlanta, GA
Specialties
Family, Adoption, Alimony, Child Abuse, Estate Planning, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce, Wills
Education
Georgia State University
State Licensing
Georgia

Tax Deduction Consulting: Child Support

Child Support Tax Deduction

The money that you pay for child support can not be used as a tax deduction.

Child Support Tax Deduction

Many non-custodial parents who are paying child support feel that this is just another example of how unfair the divorce and custody laws are structured. They know that the recipient of the child support is not claiming the support as taxable income. So, the custodial parent is getting, in effect, a tax break. It would seem to be fair that they receive a tax break also.

The truth is that the IRS is being consistent in this ruling and is not being unfair to the non-custodial parent, at least not deliberately. The principle that guides the idea of deductions of this sort is the idea that what generates a tax break for one entity generates income for another. It is a question of balance. One tax writer quipped that the formula that you use is "the IRS gives and the IRS takes away." What this means is that when you claim a deduction for something, use a medical payment to a doctor for example, someone else receives income. In this case, the doctor reports income, and you take a deduction.

This line of reasoning does not completely explain the child support tax deduction situation. The idea of generating income for others does not work in every case. There are certain functions that are considered normal and ordinary. Everyone must buy food, and so although the grocery store receives taxable income when you buy a steak, you can not claim it as a deduction for this reason. It is only when the item is something that is not a normal and expected expense that the idea of deducting it from your income comes into play.

In the case of child support, if you were not separated and living with your spouse and children, you would be paying for their clothing and their food. This would be normal and expected and you would not be claiming deductions for the things that you would be paying for their "support." The IRS does not make a dis...

Click here to read the rest of this article from BusinessTaxRecovery.com